Connect with us

Business

COVID scare at G7 meeting after Indian delegates test positive By Reuters

Published

on

COVID scare at G7 meeting after Indian delegates test positive By Reuters



© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar attends a meeting with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov in New Delhi, India, April 6, 2021. Russian Foreign Ministry/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION

By William James and Andy Bruce

LONDON (Reuters) – India’s entire delegation to the Group of Seven summit in London is self-isolating after two of its members tested positive for COVID-19, the British government said on Wednesday.

“Two delegates tested positive so the entire delegation is now self isolating,” a British official said.

“The meeting had been enabled by a strict set of COVID protocols, including daily testing of all delegates,” the British official said.

Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar did not test positive for the virus, Sky News reporter Joe Pike said on Twitter. Jaishankar was pictured meeting British interior minister Priti Patel on Tuesday.

The delegation will be attempting to meet virtually, Pike added.

The Indian High Commission in London did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Earlier, British vaccines minister Nadhim Zahawi said he was unaware of a report that delegates from G7 countries were self-isolating because of a COVID-19 scare.

India is not a G7 member but was invited by Britain to this week’s summit, along with Australia, South Africa and South Korea

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Business

White House: Biden spent nearly two hours seeking collaboration in lawmaker meeting By Reuters

Published

on

White House: Biden spent nearly two hours seeking collaboration in lawmaker meeting By Reuters



© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the April jobs report from the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., May 7, 2021. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Joe Biden held a “productive” meeting for nearly two hours with Republican and Democratic congressional leaders on Wednesday to identify areas where they could collaborate, especially with regard to infrastructure, the White House said.

“He expressed appreciation for the important priorities on which the parties had been able to work together so far, and that he wants to work diligently to build on those,” the White House said in a statement after the meeting.

“The president also emphasized that whatever differences exist between the parties, the real competition is between the United States and the rest of the world,” it said.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Former U.S. prosecutor named United Auto Workers monitor By Reuters

Published

on

Former U.S. prosecutor named United Auto Workers monitor By Reuters



© Reuters.

By David Shepardson

WASHINGTON (Reuters) -A former federal prosecutor and special inspector general who oversaw a $700 billion U.S. government bailout fund was named on Wednesday as the independent monitor to oversee the United Auto Workers union.

The appointment of Neil Barofsky, now a lawyer at Jenner & Block, was approved by U.S. District Judge David Lawson.

In total, 16 people have been convicted in a wide-ranging probe conducted by the office for the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, which last December reached a deal with the union for independent oversight.

On Tuesday, former UAW President Dennis Williams (NYSE:), was sentenced to 21 months in prison and fined $10,000 on Tuesday for conspiring to embezzle union funds.

Under the Justice Department consent decree, Barofsky has authority to exercise disciplinary powers within the UAW, investigate possible fraud or corruption within the union, and seek discipline against UAW officers and members.

The monitor can investigate, audit and review all aspects of the UAW other than collective bargaining agreements.

Several UAW officers, including the two former UAW presidents, have pleaded guilty to embezzling millions of dollars for their personal benefit, using the funds to purchase expensive liquor and cigars and to pay for golfing outings and related equipment, and expensive hotel stays.

The UAW represents about 400,000 U.S. workers, including workers at Detroit’s Big Three automakers and in other fields. At its peak in 1979, the union had a membership of some 1.5 million.

Barofsky’s oversight of the UAW is scheduled to last six years, with a potential early termination or extension depending on the circumstances. Barofsky said Wednesday he was “honored by this historic assignment and look forward to working with the UAW and the government in carrying out the Consent Decree.”

In 1988, the U.S. Justice Department sued to force out senior leaders at the International Brotherhood of Teamsters union and appointed a trustee because of the union’s connection to organized crime. The government oversaw the Teamsters from March 1989 until 2015, and a five-year transition period ensued.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Some employees say no amount of precautions will make the workplace feel safe, survey says

Published

on

Some employees say no amount of precautions will make the workplace feel safe, survey says


One in 10 employed consumers in the U.S. say that nothing would make them feel comfortable working in an environment around other people, according to a new survey.

The findings point to lingering anxieties about the Covid-19 pandemic and challenges that companies may face as they try to convince employees to return to the workplace and look to hire more workers. The National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights & Analytics polled nearly 8,000 people across industries this month.

Other consumers surveyed, however, shared precautions that could help put them at ease. The largest group — 48% of respondents — said that they needed to be vaccinated to feel comfortable returning to work and interacting with others. That was followed by 35% who said their coworkers would need to be vaccinated, 34% who said they would need social distancing at work and 33% who said their workplace would have to have mandatory mask wearing. Nearly a third of those polled said they would need wide availability of the vaccine to the public and a requirement for sick employees to stay home.

Even those who said they were vaccinated or plan to get vaccinated said in the survey that they want their company to take additional measures, such as providing enough room to spread out from coworkers.

More Americans have gotten vaccinated and fewer have gotten sick from Covid in recent weeks. More than 46% of the U.S. population has received one or more shots and 35% is fully vaccinated as of Tuesday, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The average daily rate of Covid cases fell to about 38,000 on Tuesday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University — and on Monday it dropped below 40,000 for the first time since September.

Deaths have declined steeply in the U.S., too. At its winter peak, about 3,000 deaths were recorded daily. The latest seven-day average of daily Covid deaths in the U.S. is 608, according to Hopkins data. 

The country hit another notable milestone on Monday: The Food and Drug Administration approved Pfizer and BioNTech‘s request to allow the companies’ Covid-19 vaccine to be given to kids ages 12 to 15 on an emergency use basis. That clears the way for many kids to get vaccinated ahead of the start of school in the fall.

David French, senior vice president of government relations of NRF, said the trade group has fielded many questions from its retail and restaurant members about how best to bring people back and at what pace. He said its 16,000 members have also spoken about the struggle to find job candidates to fill openings as they prepare for customers to return to stores, restaurants, vacation spots and more.

“There are really two different return-to-work questions,” he said. “There’s the return-to-work question about ‘How do we get people who are not working back into jobs?’ and then ‘How do we get people who are working, but working in a remote location, back into the office?'”

He said the survey focused on answers to the latter question — but also sheds light on some pandemic-related factors that may be causing some unemployed Americans on opt out on rejoining the workforce. Economists were recently surprise by a jump in the unemployment rate to 6.1% in April. They had been expecting to see a surge in hiring.

However, he said, it does not address another dynamic that NRF believes is playing a role, too: A $300 weekly supplement to unemployment benefits.

The April jobs report has sparked debate about why some people have remained unemployed, even as the economy reopens, vaccination rate increases and more employers look for workers. Some Republicans and business groups, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, have criticized the federal boost in unemployment payments and said it has fueled a labor shortage as people choose to stay on the sidelines. Others have pointed to other reasons that people are opting out, from a lack of child care and remote school to fears of getting Covid-19 or giving it to a family member.

The tight labor market has inspired some restaurants to boost their pay or add other perks. Chipotle Mexican Grill said Monday that it will raise restaurant workers’ pay to an average of $15 an hour by the end of June. It is also dangling referral bonuses of hundreds of dollars for employees who help it find new managers and team members. The chain is looking to hire 20,000 new workers across the country.

Convenience store chain Sheetz is also increasing its wages, after struggling to find workers. It will permanently raise wages by $2 an hour. It will pay an additional $1 an hour as a “summer stimulus” from May 21 to Sept. 23. That will amount to a new minimum wage of $13.50 for store employees and $16.50 for store supervisors. The average wage across all store employees will be $15.50 for store team members and $18.50 for supervisors.

As the spring and summer travel season heats up, the company wants to hire over 2,000 employees to check out customers, keep snacks stocked and coffee hot as more people hit the road again and more frequently stop by to fill up their cars with gas. The retailer has 621 stores throughout Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Ohio, West Virginia and North Carolina.

Travis Sheetz, chief operating officer of the privately-held company, said Sheetz typically adds staff this time of year. This spring, however, he said the company received just a small stack of job applications. Few people showed up to its hiring day in late March. Those who did tended to have narrower availability of hours when they could work.

He said that shallow pool of candidates stems from “a number of things colliding.” Among them, he said, people feel nervous about Covid. They’re coping with remote school and child-care challenges. And they’re receiving supplemental income from stimulus and unemployment.

That juggle has led some to ask themselves “‘How can I take this on right now?'” he said.

“We have a combination of expecting business to peak even greater this summer because people are just anxious to get out and at the same time, we’re operating in probably the toughest labor environment in the last 20 years,” he said.

With the pandemic, he said employers will have to make a stronger case to job candidates and make sure employees feel both safe and valued — particularly for frontline jobs that require interactions with strangers.

For example, he said, Sheetz temporarily increased pay for its workers during the height of the pandemic. It has added a parental leave policy with 12 weeks of paid time off for new moms and two weeks of paid time off for their partners. And it’s keeping safety measures like having wellness checks and quarantine pay for employees.

Yet even behind a plexiglass screen or a face mask, he said a job in retail is one that stands apart.

“The stories that you hear across the counter and from people and you getting close to your customers and your communities, that’s just very difficult to get sitting in an office job or in a warehouse,” he said. “You really can’t replace that.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending