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Emails between Steve Jobs and other Apple execs reveal conflict with Facebook has spanned more than a decade

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Emails between Steve Jobs and other Apple execs reveal conflict with Facebook has spanned more than a decade


Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

An email chain revealed by Epic Games as part of its lawsuit against Apple provides earlier context about Facebook’s battle with Apple over its App Store.

Last August, Facebook said that Apple’s App Store rules were hampering it from releasing its Facebook Gaming app for iPhones in the way it wanted to.

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said that the company had to remove the part of the app that played games — the point of the app — in order to secure approval on Apple’s App Store for iPhones.

Now, emails between three former Apple executives, including Steve Jobs, from 2011 show that a very similar conflict between Apple and Facebook was likely part of the reason for a delay for the release of an iPad Facebook app over a decade ago.

Apple’s iPad came out in 2010, but Facebook didn’t release an app for it until October 2011. Between those two dates, a Facebook engineer even quit in a public blog post, citing delays in the app’s release partially because of a “strained relationship with Apple.”

In July 2011, Apple’s then-software head Scott Forstall sent an email to former Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller and Jobs. In the message, he said that he had spoken with Mark — presumably Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg — about the Facebook iPad app.

He wrote that he told Mark that Facebook should not included “embedded apps” in its Facebook iPad app.

“Not surprisingly, he wasn’t happy with this as he considers these apps part of the ‘whole Facebook experience’ and isn’t sure they should do an iPad app without them,” Forstall wrote.

At the time, Facebook was turning its social network into a platform for games and apps. The most famous of these was Farmville, a game where users tended gardens inside their Facebook accounts.

Facebook wanted Apple to compromise. Mark suggested, according to Forstall:

  • Facebook could omit a directory of Apps in the Facebook app — not even links.
  • Facebook could prevent third-party apps from running in an “embedded web view,” or basically a browser inside the Facebook app.
  • Facebook wanted Apple to allow user posts in the news feed related to apps. Forstall wrote that those were filtered at the time, because tapping those posts would do nothing.
  • Facebook proposed having tapping one of those app links in the feed switch the user to a native app or take them to the App Store if one exists, or otherwise link out to Safari, the iPhone web browser.

Jobs, then CEO of Apple, replied from his iPad: “I agree — if we eliminate Fecebooks third proposal it sounds reasonable.”

Three days later, Forstall followed up, saying he had a long conversation with Mark, and that Facebook didn’t like Apple’s counterproposal to forbid Facebook apps to link out to Safari.

But according to Mark, there is no obvious way to distinguish between a poker game and the NYT. Both are Facebook developers and provide Facebook integration,” Forstall wrote.

Schiller, who was Apple’s head of marketing until last year, and runs Apple’s Executive Review Board that makes calls whether apps will be approved by Apple, summed up Apple’s position.

“I don’t see why we want to do that,” Schiller wrote. “All these apps won’t be native, they won’t have a relationship or license with us, we won’t review them, they won’t use our APIs or tools, they won’t use our stores, etc.”

When Facebook’s iPad app eventually launched, it said that it would not support its own Credits currency on iOS for apps like Farmville — a compromise along the lines of what Apple’s executives discussed.

In recent years, the rivalry between the two Silicon Valley neighbors has heated up. Current Apple CEO Tim Cook has taken lightly veiled shots at Facebook’s handling of user privacy, and used Facebook as the example for a recent feature about asking apps “not to track.”

Facebook has mounted an ad campaign to say that the iPhone maker’s privacy features hurt small businesses. It has also continued to tweak Apple’s App Store policies, criticizing Apple’s 30% App Store fee for online events in addition to its complaints about its gaming app.

Facebook isn’t part of Epic Games’ argument in its legal battle against Apple and its App Store policies. The trial started on Monday and is expected to run three weeks.



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David Einhorn makes a case for copper to ride renewable energy trend, recommends two miner stocks

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David Einhorn makes a case for copper to ride renewable energy trend, recommends two miner stocks


David Einhorn speaking at the SOHN conference in New York, May 6, 2019.

Heidi Gutman | CNBC

Greenlight Capital’s David Einhorn is getting bullish on copper on the back of a demand surge for green energy, and he revealed his best picks to ride the boom in renewables Wednesday at the Sohn Conference.

Copper is widely used in batteries and electric motors as well as wind and solar installation because of the metal’s special features including electric and thermal conductivity, and corrosion resistance, the hedge fund manager said.



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U.S. April budget deficit narrows as revenues rise, outlays fall – Treasury By Reuters

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U.S. April budget deficit narrows as revenues rise, outlays fall – Treasury By Reuters



© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: The United States Department of the Treasury is seen in Washington, D.C., U.S., August 30, 2020. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. government posted a $226 billion budget deficit in April, a drop of $512 billion or 69% from the gap in April 2020, the first full month of COVID-19 lockdowns, as pandemic-related outlays fell and revenues rose sharply.

The Treasury Department said that the deficit for the first seven months of fiscal 2021 still hit a new record of $1.932 trillion, a 30% increase from the same period of fiscal 2020.

April receipts rose 82% from a year earlier to $439 billion, but the increase is partly due to last year’s deferral of income tax payments to July. The Treasury deferred tax payments this year by only one month, until May 17, with no deferral for corporate taxes.

April outlays were $665 billion, a decrease of 32% from April 2020, as that month contained the bulk of payments to individuals in the first round of coronavirus rescue aid. Payments under President Joe Biden’s stimulus plan this year were mainly sent in March.

Year-to-date receipts for fiscal 2021 totaled $2.143 trillion, up 16% from the year-ago period, while year-to-date outlays totaled $4.075 trillion, up 22%.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Factbox-Republicans erect voting barriers across U.S. battleground states By Reuters

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Factbox-Republicans erect voting barriers across U.S. battleground states By Reuters


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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Protesters gather outside of the Georgia State Capitol to protest HB 531, which would place tougher restrictions on voting in Georgia, in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. March 4, 2021. Georgia enacted the restrictions on March 25. REUTERS/Dustin Chambe

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By Julia Harte

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican lawmakers in election battleground states have passed a wave of new voting requirements and limits this year, saying the measures are needed to curb voter fraud despite scant evidence of it in the United States.

Backers of the measures cite former President Donald Trump’s baseless claim that fraud underlay his decisive presidential election loss to Democrat Joe Biden in November. Democrats and voting rights advocates have sued state officials over the new laws, denouncing the efforts as partisan power grabs that will disproportionately disenfranchise voters of color.

ARIZONA

Republican Governor Doug Ducey signed a law on Tuesday to stop counties from automatically mailing Arizonans early ballots if they do not use them often enough. The legislation, also passed on Tuesday, will remove voters from the state’s “Early Voting List” if they fail to submit an early ballot at least once every two election cycles.

Republican lawmakers in most other states have bundled voting restrictions into sweeping bills to pass them in one go, but they are taking a piecemeal approach in Arizona. The state’s legislature is expected to consider other voting hurdles in coming weeks, including a bill requiring absentee voters to provide more proof of identity.

TEXAS

The Texas House of Representatives passed new Republican-backed voting restrictions on May 7, barring officials from mass-mailing absentee ballot applications and giving partisan poll watchers more access to voting sites. The state Senate previously approved its own bill, which would eliminate extended voting hours and prohibit drive-through voting.

A bicameral committee is next expected to combine both bills into a final version, in a largely closed-door process controlled by Republicans. The final measure would then get one last vote from each chamber before heading to Republican Governor Greg Abbott, who has indicated he will sign it into law.

FLORIDA

A law signed by Republican Governor Ron DeSantis on May 6 imposed additional requirements on requesting and submitting absentee ballots. Absentee voters must submit new proof of identity when requesting their ballots and reapply for absentee ballots in each new general election cycle, rather than every two cycles.

The law also limited the use of absentee drop boxes to the early voting period, gave partisan election observers more power to raise objections and required people offering voters assistance to stay at least 150 feet (45 meters) away from polling places, an increase from the previous 100-foot (30-meter) radius.

GEORGIA

One of the most controversial new voting measures passed in Georgia, where Republican Governor Brian Kemp signed a law on March 25 that tightened absentee ballot identification requirements, restricted ballot drop-box use and allowed a Republican-controlled state agency to take over local voting operations.

Critics said the legislation aims to disenfranchise Black voters, who helped propel Biden to the presidency and deliver Democrats two U.S. Senate victories in Georgia in January that gave them control of the chamber. Top U.S. companies also decried Georgia’s law, and Major League Baseball moved its All-Star game out of the state in protest.

IOWA

Republican Governor Kim Reynolds signed a law on March 9 that shortened the state’s early voting period and Election Day polling place hours, imposed tighter deadlines for absentee ballots to be submitted, and made it a felony for election officials to disobey guidance from Iowa’s secretary of state, who is currently a Republican.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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