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India posts record daily rise in coronavirus deaths By Reuters

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India posts record daily rise in coronavirus deaths By Reuters


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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Healthcare workers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) stand outside a donning area at a COVID-19 care facility, amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Mumbai, India, May 4, 2021. REUTERS/Niharika Kulkarni

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(Reuters) – India’s coronavirus deaths rose by a record 3,780 during the last 24 hours, a day after it became the second country to cross the grim milestone of 20 million infections after the United states.

Daily infections rose by 382,315 on Wednesday, health ministry data showed. Government modelling had pointed to a peak by Wednesday, a few days earlier than thought, since the virus has spread faster than expected.

The surge of the highly infectious Indian variant of the coronavirus has seen hospitals runs out of beds and oxygen and left morgues and crematoriums overflowing. Many people have died in ambulances and car parks waiting for a bed or oxygen.

Two “oxygen express” trains reached the capital Delhi on Wednesday carrying desperately needed liquid oxygen, Minister of Railways Piyush Goyal said on Twitter. Over 25 trains have so far delivered oxygen to different parts of India.

India’s government says there are enough oxygen supplies but distribution has been hindered by transport problems.

A two-judge bench of the Delhi High Court has been holding almost daily video conferences to hear petitions from hospitals seeking oxygen and invoking India’s constitutional right to protection of life.

India’s surge in infections has coincided with a dramatic drop in vaccinations due to supply and delivery problems.

At least three states, including Maharashtra, home to the commercial capital of Mumbai, have reported a scarcity of vaccines, shutting down some inoculation centres.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has been widely criticised for not acting sooner to suppress the second wave of the virus. Religious festivals and political rallies have attracted tens of thousands of people in super spreader events.

“We need a government. Desperately. And we don’t have one. We are running out of air. We are dying…” wrote Indian author Arundhati Roy in an opinion piece published on Tuesday calling for Modi to step down.

“This is a crisis of your making. You cannot solve it. You can only make it worse….So please go. It is the most responsible thing for you to do. You have forfeited the moral right to be our prime minister.”

India’s opposition has called for a nationwide lockdown, but the government is reluctant to impose a shutdown for fear of the economic fallout, although several states have imposed social curbs.

India’s central bank asked banks on Wednesday to let certain borrowers have more time to repay loans as the surge in infections impacts a nascent economic revival.

India has an estimated 3.45 million active cases, but medical experts say the actual numbers of dead and infected could be five to 10 times higher. The country added 10 million cases in just over four months, after taking more than 10 months to reach the first 10 million.

Daily testing in India has fallen sharply to 1.5 million, state-run Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) said on Wednesday. It hit a peak of 1.95 million on Saturday.

Public health experts believe India will not reach herd immunity any time soon but say hospitalisations and deaths will reduce significantly in six to nine months, according to a report in The Economic Times.

Herd immunity is when a high enough proportion of the population is vaccinated or been infected and developed antibodies so that one infected person could theoretically only infect less than one person, halting the spread of the virus.

Cricket officials suspended the hugely popular, money-spinning Indian Premier League (IPL) on Tuesday as the pandemic spirals out of control.

Eight Asiatic lions at an Indian zoo in the southern state of Hyderabad have contracted the coronavirus, the government said on Tuesday, adding that there was no evidence that animals could transmit the disease to humans.





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‘Green’ stocks are getting hit this year, but this strategist still backs his favorites

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‘Green’ stocks are getting hit this year, but this strategist still backs his favorites


The wind energy park “Odervorland” in the district of Oder-Spree in Brandenburg, Germany.

Patrick Pleul | picture alliance | Getty Images

Stocks tied to the “green transformation” theme are taking a hit so far this year, but one equity strategist is backing a number of them for the long-term.

It comes after a bumper rise for green energy stocks in 2020, as oil and gas companies suffered at the hands of plunging demand due to the pandemic. But the roles have reversed so far this year.

“Our guess is that investors are beginning to calibrate their views on the green transformation and asking whether they are paying too much for future growth,” Saxo Bank Head of Equity Strategy Peter Garnry said in a note to investors earlier this month.

At the time, Saxo Bank’s “green transformation” basket of 40 stocks — which includes high-profile names such as Tesla — was down 9.1% so far in 2021, making it the worst performer among the Danish investment bank’s equity themes.

The broad move lower has continued, with the majority of green stocks falling last week as global markets experienced another wobble on inflation fears.

Despite this, Garnry remains bullish on the sector for a number of key reasons.



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At Miss Universe pageant, Myanmar’s contestant pleads “our people are dying” By Reuters

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At Miss Universe pageant, Myanmar’s contestant pleads “our people are dying” By Reuters


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© Reuters. Ma Thuzar Wint Lwin, Miss Universe Myanmar, holds up the “Pray for Myanmar” sign during Miss Universe pageant’s national costume show, in Hollywood, Florida, U.S., May 13, 2021 in this screengrab taken from a handout video. Courtesy MISS UNIVERSE/Handout

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(Reuters) – Myanmar’s Miss Universe contestant, Thuzar Wint Lwin, used the pageant on Sunday to urge the world to speak out against the military junta, whose security forces have killed hundreds of opponents since it seized power in a Feb. 1 coup.

“Our people are dying and being shot by the military every day,” she said in a video message for the competition, where she was appearing in the finals at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida.

“I would like to urge everyone to speak about Myanmar. As Miss Universe Myanmar since the coup, I have been speaking out as much as I can,” she said.

Myanmar’s junta spokesman did not answer calls seeking comment.

Thuzar Wint Lwin is among dozens of Myanmar celebrities, actors, social media influencers and sports people who have voiced opposition to the coup, in which elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi was overthrown and detained.

At least 790 people have been killed by security forces since the coup, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners activist group. It says over 5,000 people have been arrested, with some 4,000 still detained – including several celebrities.

Thuzar Wint Lwin did not make it to the last round of the Miss Universe competition, but she won the award for Best National Costume, which was based on the ethnic costume of her Chin people from northwestern Myanmar, where fighting has raged in recent days between the army and anti-junta militia fighters.

As she paraded with her national costume, she held up a placard that said “Pray for Myanmar”.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Oil Up as Fuel Demand Outlook Improves But Clouded by Asian COVID Outbreaks By Investing.com

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Oil Up as Fuel Demand Outlook Improves But Clouded by Asian COVID Outbreaks By Investing.com



© Reuters.

By Gina Lee

Investing.com – Oil was up on Monday morning in Asia as investors are optimistic about the recovery of fuel demand in key markets, despite concerns over the COVID-19 resurgence in parts of Asia.

rose 0.51% to $69.06 by 11:16 PM ET (3:16 AM GMT). jumped 0.52% to $65.70, and rolled over to the Jul. 21 contract on May 16.

Crude demand is increasing as the U.S. and parts of Europe continue their economic recovery from COVID-19 thanks to an accelerating COVID-19 vaccination rate. In the U.K., the government said on Sunday that more than 20 million people, or 38% of the British adult population, have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

On the supply front, pump stations in the U.S. are restarting to supply gasoline as Colonial Pipeline is slowly restarting its entire pipeline system after being hit by a cyber-attack earlier in the month.

Meanwhile, U.S. energy firms added oil and rigs for three consecutive weeks due to higher crude prices, energy services firm Baker Hughes Co. said on Friday.

However, , including Singapore and Taiwan, are seeing new outbreaks of COVID-19 cases. Meanwhile, Japan on Friday further expanded a COVID-19 state of emergency before the beginning of the Tokyo Olympics in July and some Indian states said on Sunday that they would extend COVID-19 restrictions.

“Oil prices are under pressure as a spike in the COVID-19 pandemic is spreading from India to other parts of Asia, which increased concerns over slower recovery in fuel demand,” Kazuhiko Saito, chief analyst at commodities broker Fujitomi Co., told Reuters.

Data from China, the world’s biggest oil importer, released earlier in the day also disappointed as the country’s growth slowed down to 9.8% year-on-year in April.

Across the Middle East, Israel and Palestinians’ conflict moved into its second week, with no clear end in sight to the violence.

However, some investors remained optimistic.

“As long as the fight does not spill over to oil-producing countries in the region, there will be limited impact on the oil market,” Fujitomi’s Saito said.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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