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U.S. birth rate falls to its lowest since 1979 as pandemic-led stress rises By Reuters

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U.S. birth rate falls to its lowest since 1979 as pandemic-led stress rises By Reuters


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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A woman wearing a protective face mask pushes a baby stroller, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Gentry Plaza State Park in the Queens borough of New York, U.S., March 1, 2021. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

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By Bhargav Acharya

(Reuters) – Americans had the lowest number of babies in more than four decades, mirroring a slump in European birth rates, as the COVID-19 pandemic forced more people to take care of sick family members or deal with job losses.

Birth rate in the United States fell 4% in 2020 to about 3.6 million babies, its sixth consecutive annual decline and the lowest since 1979, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics.

The CDC did not attribute the overall decline to the pandemic, but experts have predicted that pandemic-led reasons including anxiety will hit the country’s birth rate.

In general, U.S. fertility rates have continued to fall over the years as women marry late and delay motherhood especially in years when the economy has slowed.

Older data https://www.prb.org/usrecessionandbirthrate from Population Reference Bureau (PRB), a nonprofit statistics collector, showed that the U.S. birth rate reached an all-time low in 1936 following the 1929 stock market crash.

Later, through the 1970s, birth rates took a hit again in the wake of big social changes including the landmark Roe v. Wade legal case on abortion.

In December 2020, Brookings Institute said in a report that it anticipates around 300,000 fewer births in the United States in 2021.

Many European countries have also seen a decline in births, and demographics experts have forecast a baby bust across the continent this year.

For instance, births in Italy in December – nine months after the country went into Europe’s first lockdown – plunged 22%, data showed.

Big corporations such as Reckitt, Nestle and Danone have posted a drop in sales of baby formula, partly blaming declining birth rates as well.

CDC said United States’ general fertility rate, which measures the number of births per 1,000 women aged between 15 and 44 declined by 4%.

This provisional data is based on 99.87% of all birth records registered and processed last year by the National Center for Health Statistics as of Feb. 11, 2021, according to CDC.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Citigroup fails to obtain longer freeze on botched Revlon transfer By Reuters

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Citigroup fails to obtain longer freeze on botched Revlon transfer By Reuters



© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A view of the exterior of the Citibank corporate headquarters in New York, New York, U.S. May 20, 2015. REUTERS/Mike Segar

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A federal judge on Wednesday rejected Citigroup Inc (NYSE:)’s request to extend a freeze on about $504 million it accidentally sent a group of Revlon Inc lenders, while it appeals his decision that they can keep the money.

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman in Manhattan also gave Citigroup seven days to appeal, and said if it does his existing temporary restraining order over the assets will remain in effect pending a ruling.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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New York jet fuel gets pricier as Colonial Pipeline outage continues

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New York jet fuel gets pricier as Colonial Pipeline outage continues


American Airlines planes at LaGuardia Airport

Leslie Josephs | CNBC

Jet fuel is getting pricier nationwide and even more so in the New York City area as the Colonial Pipeline outage continues.

The premium on jet fuel prices in New York Harbor was going for nearly $1.87 a gallon on Tuesday, close to 9 cents more than the U.S. Gulf Coast price, the largest premium since February 2020, according to S&P Global Platts.

Airlines, including Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and JetBlue Airways, said they their operations haven’t been impacted. American Airlines, however, added temporary refueling stops this week until Thursday to two long-haul flights out of Charlotte, while Southwest Airlines is flying planes with extra fuel into Nashville International Airport and others, a measure known as tankering that carriers turn to during times of supply shortages, such as after hurricanes.

Airlines and airports this week said they were looking at alternative methods of obtaining fuel beyond the Colonial Pipeline, the country’s largest refined fuel-products pipeline.

“Since notification of the pipeline’s temporary shutdown, BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport has worked with airline partners and fueling companies to put alternate fueling measures in place,” a spokesman for the Baltimore airport told CNBC. “We continue to monitor the situation, and will adjust plans as needed until the pipeline is back online.”

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which oversees the major airports serving the New York City area said it is “not experiencing any immediate impacts from the Colonial Pipeline shutdown.

“We are continuing to closely monitor the situation and remain in regular contact with gasoline and diesel fuel suppliers for the Port Authority vehicle fleet and with the airlines and other airport stakeholders about jet fuel supply,” a spokeswoman said.

Jet fuel for the Gulf Coast, an industry benchmark, on Tuesday hit $1.78 a gallon, the highest since January 2020. Prices have climbed by 33% this year as more customers return to air travel. The higher prices for fuel, generally airlines’ largest cost after labor, comes just as more customers are expected to fly during the peak summer travel months.



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JPMorgan’s Kolanovic says the market is now ‘getting cheap,’ favors economic recovery stocks

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JPMorgan’s Kolanovic says the market is now ‘getting cheap,’ favors economic recovery stocks


Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Nov. 4th. 2020.

NYSE

JPMorgan‘s Marko Kolanovic told CNBC on Wednesday he feels the stock market’s recent declines are “overdone a little bit,” creating opportunities for investors.

“I think market is now actually getting cheap, in some sense,” the firm’s chief global markets strategist said on “Halftime Report.” He added, “I think we’re at the end of this upset. I think the market is going to go higher here. That said, we do still again prefer reflationary themes.”

Kolanovic’s remarks came as the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down nearly 500 points Wednesday. The tech-heavy Nasdaq fell around 2.1%, while the broad S&P 500 was lower by roughly 1.6%.



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